Planning for College…at 13 years old?

When I was in high school, I was clueless about the college process.  I had a vague notion that I would go.  I was in a college prep magnet school after all.  Everyone in my school was expected to go to college or university.  But I didn’t have a real vision of college.  Or what to do to prepare myself.  Or, how much it would cost.

Fortunately  I was a good standardized test taker and my SATs made me desirable to colleges.  But including my grades, not desirable enough to offer huge scholarships. My mother, God bless her, paid for the majority of my undergrad education.  I only had to take out a few small loans.

Ironically, I wound up working as a recruiter for colleges and universities once I graduated.  I educated high school students and families what to do to prepare themselves and their finances for college attendance.  And now, I want to use all that expertise to prepare Mirror Image.  And I want to do it too much.

Fortunately, when Mirror Image was in elementary school, she developed into a very bright student.  Loved learning, loved delighting her teachers and loved being the best student.  She was competitive. She carried the good grades into Middle School where she has been on the Honor Roll and Principal’s List and last week, was inducted into the National Junior Honor Society.

If she wants to, she can parlay her natural abilities into high school success and eventual college scholarships.

This has made me a bit greedy strategic in my thinking.

I want a paid college experience for her soooo bad.  I want it soooo much that I am really pushing her to get the best possible grades, stay on the honor roll NO MATTER WHAT. And, I am going to push her to get an associates degree while in high school.  Our County offers this with the local community college – earning an A.A. while earning a high school diploma.

Only paying for 2 years of college (excluding any types of scholarships, of course) is a HUGE savings.  Plus, it allows us to invest more in advance degrees, which she will likely need, if she continues to love the idea of a career in STEM.

But she doesn’t quite appreciate my nagging enthusiasm.  That is because she is not mother of a lovely bright daughter paying the mortgage, supporting an excitable destructive German shepherd dog, currently replacing the hot water heater (more on that in another post) who now knows the value of stretching yourself a bit more for big payoffs at the end.

I think when she is a mom of a genius, she will appreciate me then.

Don’t you?

Question – How early do you think families should start the college planning process?

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